Kids

A Time to Break Silence by Martin Luther King Jr.

A Time to Break Silence presents the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s most important writings and speeches--carefully selected by teachers across a variety of disciplines--in an accessible and user-friendly volume for students. Arranged thematically in six parts, the collection includes eighteen selections and is introduced by award-winning author Walter Dean Myers. Included are some of Dr. King's most well-known and frequently taught classic works, like "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and "I Have a Dream," as well as lesser-known pieces such as "The Sword that Heals" and "What Is Your Life's Blueprint?," which speak to issues young people face today.

(excerpt from www.goodreads.com)

Marching to the Mountaintop by Ann Bausum

In early 1968 the grisly on-the-job deaths of two African American sanitation workers in Memphis, Tennessee, prompted an extended strike by that city's segregated force of trash collectors. Workers sought union protection, higher wages, improved safety, and the integration of their work force. Their work stoppage became a part of the larger civil rights movement and drew an impressive array of national movement leaders to Memphis, including, on more than one occasion, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

King added his voice to the struggle in what became the final speech of his life. His assassination in Memphis on April 4 not only sparked protests and violence throughout America; it helped force the acceptance of worker demands in Memphis. The sanitation strike ended eight days after King's death.

The connection between the Memphis sanitation strike and King's death has no received the emphasis it deserves, especially for younger readers.  Bausum's Marching to the Mountaintop explores how the media, politics, the Civil Rights Movement, and labor protests all converged to set the scene for one of King's greatest speeches and for his tragic death.

(excerpt from www.goodreads.com)

We March by Shane W. Evans

On August 28, 1963, a remarkable event took place--more than 250,000 people gathered in our nation's capital to participate in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The march began at the Washington Monument and ended with a rally at the Lincoln Memorial, where Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his historic "I Have a Dream" speech, advocating racial harmony. Many words have been written about that day, but few so delicate and powerful as those presented here by award-winning author and illustrator Shane W. Evans. When combined with his simple yet compelling illustrations, the thrill of the day is brought to life for even the youngest reader to experience.

(excerpt from www.goodreads.com)

Library closed on January 19, 2015

ELPL will be closed on Monday, January 19, 2015 in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. 

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The Pigeon Needs a Bath! by Mo Willems

Another great read from Willems in the fabulous Pigeon series.


From Goodreads.com

The Pigeon really needs a bath! Except, the Pigeon's not so sure about that. Besides, he took a bath last month! Maybe. It's going to take some serious convincing to try and get the Pigeon to take the plunge.

Books & Bagels December 2014

East Lansing Public Library
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End of Year Library Closures

ELPL will be closed on:

Wednesday, December 24
Thursday, December 25
Wednesday, December 31
Thursday, January 1

The library will be open regular hours on any dates not listed above.  Regular hours are:

Monday-Thursday, 10am-9pm
Friday and Saturday, 10am-6pm
Sunday, 1-5pm (Labor Day through Memorial Day only)

"At Your Library"

Here are all of the great things you can do at your library. What can you do for your library?

GIVE!

Find out more at elpl.org/donate

 

"At Your Library"
Performed by: Back row (L to R): Kristin Shelley, Jill Abood, Mary Mitchell, Amanda and Charlotte Stratton, Phyllis Thode
Front row (L to R): Jacob Bungard, Josh White Jr., Cliff Gracey, Karrie Korroch

Written by: Phyllis Thode

Filmed and Edited by: Ron Stratton

 

 

 

Little Lord Fauntleroy by Frances Hodgson Burnett

I just loved this classic children's story again after many years, having found it on another library's list of classic children's fiction.  The mean and horrible Earl of Dorincourt had previously severed relations with his youngest son for marrying an unimportant American commoner, and now he finds that he needs the unknown grandson as this heir.  So the Earl summons the young barbarian to the family estate in England, expecting the worst.

We, who haven't read the story in a long time, remember this as a rags-to-riches tale of a poor boy who finds himself suddenly wealthy and influential.  Bah!  This reading I was fascinated by the old aristocratic bigoted grandfather who has lived so long without learning important lessons.

I am reminded of other "children's classics" where unexpected, unwelcome children enter the lives of grumpy antisocial elders.  The grownups are the people who grow as a result!  Check out Pollyanna by Eleanor H. Porter (the Glad Game?) and Good night, Mr. Tom by Michelle Magorian.  Did these books change, or did I?  Maybe you, too, need a review of classic children's literature!

Susan


From Goodreads.com

Little Lord Fauntleroy (1885, 1886) by Frances Hodgson Burnett is a beloved children's novel that made a huge impact on the 19th century public, shaping everything from boys' clothing fashions to copyright law. Cedric Errol is a generous, kind, and exemplary middle-class American boy who is suddenly found to be the heir of the Earl of Dorincourt. Saying loving goodbyes to his working-class friends, Cedric goes to England together with his mother to embrace his new fortune. His grandfather, the old earl, is a bitter old man ridden with gout and a foul temper, trusting no one. However the angelic boy elicits a profound transformation in the grandfather, which not only benefits the castle household but the whole populace of the earldom.

If only the old man's heart would soften toward Cedric's estranged mother, the family would be healed at last. And when another potential heir to the earldom makes a claim, it seems that everything is lost....

But all things are possible through a child's innocent trust, true friendship, and unconditional love.

Bread and Jam for Frances by Russell Hoban

I loved all of the Frances books as a child.  I actually still own copies of these books that were given to me as gifts when I was a very young person. The illustrations by Garth Williams and Lillian Hoban are wonderful. I loved the little songs that Frances would make up to get her through life. Also, Frances runs away to under the dining room table, which is what I did as a kid.  

Kristin


From Goodreads.com

Frances, one of children's best-loved characters for over 30 years, now springs to life even more in Bread and Jam for Frances,beautifully reillustrated in sparkling full color by Lillian Hoban. In this memorable story, Frances decides that bread and jam are all she wants to eat, and her understanding parents grant her wish'at breakfast, lunch, dinner, and even snacktime. Can there ever be too much bread and jam?

Mighty Dads by Joan Holub

A new book illustrated by the creator of the Pete the Cat series, Mighty Dads features different types of construction vehicles and their child counterparts.  On each page you see what the “dad truck” teaches their son or daughter.  Children love seeing the little version of the big truck and repeating what the dad truck is training them to do.  Very sweet for the preschool set!

Phyllis


From Goodreads.com

A new constructacular picture book from the New York Times bestselling creator of Pete the Cat, James Dean and bestselling author, Joan Holub.

Mighty dads, strong and tall,
help their children, young and small.

They keep them safe and bolted tight
and show them how to build things right.

Inventively told through James Dean's colorful construction vehicle characters, MIGHTY DADS is an adoring dedication to hardworking fathers and the subtle ways they teach their boys and girls to follow in their tracks. The Dump Trucks learn to get dirty. Crane keeps his little one safe from harm. The busy Cement Mixer gives his daughter a hug. The Forklift cheers his son on.

A surprising and touching view of a father's love for his children, MIGHTY DADS is the perfect way to say: I'm proud of you! 

Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskey

Make Way for Ducklings, a picture book by Robert McCloskey, was awarded the Caldecott Medal in 1941.  It is a wonderful, timeless story of how a family of ducks find a home on an island in the Boston Public Garden.  There is an actual bronze sculpture of the duckling family commemorating the book located in the Boston Public Garden.

Kathy


From Goodreads.com

This classic tale of the famous Mallard ducks of Boston is available for the first time in a full-sized paperback edition. Awarded the Caldecott Medal in 1942, Make Way for Ducklings has been described as "one of the merriest picture books ever" (The New York Times). Ideal for reading aloud, this book deserves a place of honor on every child's bookshelf.

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