Kids

The Princess and the Pony by Kate Beaton

Kate Beaton is probably best known for her webcomics -- she’s the creative mind behind the ultra-popular Hark! A Vagrant, a hysterical take on history, as well as several autobiographical comics about her experiences growing up in Nova Scotia. In The Princess and the Pony, her first picture book for early elementary readers, she brings her trademark charm, humor, and eye for setting to the table again, this time as we join the fearless Princess Pinecone on her quest to receive the perfect birthday present. This year, she doesn’t want yet another cutesy sweater -- she has her heart set on a fierce battle horse to ride during the hero’s competition! She knows she can take on the other fearsome warriors on once she has a trusty steed of her own.

When her pony shows up, though, it’s not quite what she was hoping for. It’s short and fat, it’s eyes point in different directions (sometimes), and it has an unfortunate tendency towards gassiness. There’s no way Princess Pinecone will be able to become the ultimate champion riding this pony into battle... is there?

Full to the brim with engaging drawings, silly humor and vocabulary, and strong messages (particularly those of friendship, acceptance, combating stereotypes, and the fact that everyone -- even round, flatulent ponies -- have something valuable to bring to the table), this a book that kids will want to read over and over again, and parents (especially if they’re fans of Beaton’s work themselves, in which case they might recognize the eponymous pony from her earlier comics), will be happy to indulge them.

Find The Princess and the Pony at ELPL (as well as a printed collection of Hark! A Vagrant for adults). 

National Book Award for Young People's Literature Longlist

The longlist for 2015’s National Book Award for Young People’s Literature has been announced! Check out some of these titles (ranging in age from 4th to 12th grade audiences) for your next great read, and stay tuned to see who the winner is -- finalists are announced October 14th, and the winner will be revealed November 18th!

 

Egg and Spoon by Gregory Maguire

I recently read Egg and Spoon by Gregory Maguire.  Egg and Spoon is a crazy mash up of a folk/fairy tale involving two girls from very different circumstances who accidentally switch places, Baba Yaga, and Czarist Russia.  There's magic, there's history, there's lots of confusion.

Those who have read Wicked will be familiar with Maguire's writing style.  It works very well here.  You will find it in the library's J Fiction section in the Children's room but don't be put off by that.  Like The Golden Compass, this book will entertain readers of all ages.

Chiggers by Hope Larson

It’s finally summer, and thirteen year old Abby is back at the sleepaway camp she’s loved attending for the last several years. Except this summer, things have started changing. There are new piercings, new boys, even new natural phenomena (including will o’ the wisps and the eponymous biting pests -- chiggers). Then there’s the new girl, Shasta, who no one can seem to stand except for Abby. As her summer at camp continues to go entirely differently (and a lot less smoothly) than she’d imagined it would, Abby has to realign her expectations, examine her own hang ups, and try to figure out her role in this familiar environment that’s suddenly not so familiar.

Aimed at readers ages 10 - 14, Chiggers, by Hope Larson fills an important role in the graphic novel genre -- realistic fiction for tween and teen girls, which are still comparatively few and far between in this medium. Chiggers does an admirable (and accurate) job of translating the sometimes confusing experience of growing up girl into a visual medium.

This is a great story for those who want to relive their summer camp experience, as well as those who simply appreciate a thoughtful, well-done graphic novel. Fans of Raina Telgemeier’s Smile and Sisters will likely enjoy this book as well, and recognize some common themes -- particularly, being a girl on the edge of teenagedom. Chiggers may not have as much action and adventure as some readers might expect from a graphic novel, but it overflows with heart, charm, and style.

Find it at ELPL here!

Graphic Novels for Kids

Looking for a great graphic novel for young readers? Check out some of our the past year’s best titles for kids and tweens here at ELPL!

Want more? Be sure to browse our graphic novel section in the children’s room or ask a librarian for help to discover your next great read!

Literacy-Based Apps for Kids

Digital literacy is an increasingly important factor of young children's education. Check out some of these free literacy-based apps that will help your toddler or preschooler read, write, play, and learn!

Michigan Reads! 2015

Do Unto OttersMr. Rabbit’s new neighbors are otters. Otters! But he doesn’t know anything about otters. Will they get along? Will they be friends? “Just treat otters the same way you’d like them to treat you,” advises Mr. Owl.

(Excerpt from inside flap)

Parents and young readers, be sure to check out the 2015 Michigan Reads! title Do Unto Otters by Laurie Keller! Each year, the Library of Michigan works to promote early childhood literacy by selecting one picture book for parents, grandparents, teachers, and caregivers across the state to enjoy with their young readers. This year’s selection, Do Unto Otters, is a charming read that uses humor and colorful illustrations to explore concepts like kindness, manners, and the Golden Rule.

You can also pick up coloring sheets, bookmarks, and sign our poster in the kids’ room once you’ve read the book, or watch the Do Unto Otters BookFlix movie, available through the Michigan eLibrary.

Looking for even more great picture books? Enjoy some past Michigan Reads! titles!

2014: Acoustic Rooster by Kwame Alexander

2013: Woolbur by Leslie Helakoski

2012: Moose on the Loose by Kathy-jo Wargin

2011: Memoirs of a Goldfish by Devin Scillian

2010: The Runaway Garden by Jeffrey Schatzer

2009: The Pout Pout Fish by Deborah Diesen

2008: Raccoon Tune by Nancy Shaw

2007: Big Chickens by Leslie Helakoski

2006: Bed Hogs by Kelly DiPucchio

2004: Barnyard Song by Rhonda Gowler Greene

The ELPL September 2015 Newsletter Is Out!

The newsletter is out and full of great events for all ages!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amazing Selection of Children's Materials For Sale in the Friendshop!

Make sure to stop by the library's Friendshop to browse the latest batch of children's books for sale.  They just arrived and are priced to sell!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Muy Caliente Musica

Latin music will forever remind me of my honeymoon in the Dominican Republic.  Recently, I took a Zumba class at the Hannah Community Center and now latin music reminds me of zumba!  Whatever the reason, I love latin music!  It puts me in a good mood, provides a boost of energy and makes me smile - even though I know very little of the Spanish language!  Luckily, ELPL has many awesome latin music choices both on CD and with Hoopla.  Here are some of my favorites:

The Last Don II by Don Omar
La Historia de el Duo by Wisin & Yandel ("The Duo of History")
Double Vision by Prince Royce  (with appearances by Snoop Dogg and J Lo!)  
A Quien Quiera Escuchar by Ricky Martin ("To Those Who Want to Listen")
Dale by Pitbull

 

To see all of ELPL's latin music cd's, click here

To see all of ELPL's latin music Hoopla downloads, click here

ELPL Downtown Maker Studio to Remain Open through May 2016

The East Lansing Public Library (ELPL) is excited to announce that the 2.0 Maker Studio, located in downtown East Lansing on the second floor of the East Lansing Marriott at University Place, will remain open for an additional 10 months, through May 2016. 

Across Generations Videofest

When Michele Norris spoke at the Wharton Center on September 15, 2014 as part of the One Book, One Community program, she told the audience to talk to our parents, grandparents, our aunts and uncles, our elders to hear their stories. She said we need to have conversations with our elders to preserve our family histories or to know where we came from.

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